Category Archives: Japan

Three Things to Remember when Looking for an Interpreter

Most interpreting requests are for “consecutive” interpreting, where the interpreter listens, then interprets into the other language). The other type of interpreting is “simultaneous” interpreting, where the interpreter listens and speaks simultaneously, so that the client does not have to stop mid-flow. Continue reading

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The Palace Ride

The Palace Ride involves teams and individuals riding, jogging or walking around the Imperial Palace in Tokyo in relays, so that for 24 hours there is at least one participant circling the Palace.
Mirai no Mori also offers the children who attend the camp on-going, long-term support, which significantly increases the chances of a more favourable outcome in their lives.
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A bridge too far—how not to manage a large-scale translation project

How should a translation company approach a high-volume project? And what is the most ethical response to a client that insists that it needs an extremely high volume of material translated in an unrealistically short time? Continue reading

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The good, the bad and the ugly—ensuring quality in Japanese‑to‑English translation

In Japan, with its huge Japanese‑to‑English translation market, the caveat that a translator should only translate into his or her own native language goes largely ignored, and a huge volume of Japanese material ends up being translated by native speakers of Japanese—often with dire results. Continue reading

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Why is there such large variation in the prices charged by different translation companies?

Many translation companies choose to compete on price, which requires that they slash their own costs to the bone. Continue reading

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What does it mean when a government agency insists that the translation of a document be “certified”?

This simply means that the translator or translation company that carries out the work is required to append a statement to the end of the translated document stating that, in their view, the translation represents a complete and accurate rendition … Continue reading

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Is there such a thing as a “qualified” or “certified” translator?

There are a number of industry organizations and academic institutions that offer certification and qualifications in translation and interpreting. However, there is no real standardization nationally or internationally regarding testing criteria, and no compelling evidence that the holders of these … Continue reading

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Why is there so much bad translation out there?

In Europe it is axiomatic that a translator should only translate into his or her own native language—the rationale being that non-native speakers of the target language lack the ability to write as clearly and fluently as a native speakers can. Thus, only a native German speaker will be assigned English-to-German translation work. In Japan, however, this basic tenet goes largely ignored. Continue reading

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Translation and interpreting—what’s the difference?

A translator works on a written document, reading the content in the source language (e.g. Japanese) and producing the equivalent document in the target language (e.g. English). An interpreter acts as a verbal intermediary between two or more people whose native languages are different. Continue reading

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Helping Japan’s most vulnerable children

At Honyaku Plus, we are in awe of the selfless dedication of the Mirai no Mori team and fully recognize the great social significance of the work that they are undertaking.
We were happy to be able to support their efforts by providing them with pro bono translation services. Continue reading

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